Grants

Through the IFPDA Foundation, the IFPDA provides grants for exhibitions, scholarly publications, and educational programs that promote a greater awareness and appreciation of fine prints.

2016 Grant Awards

East Coast Screenprint Biennial
East Coast Screenprint Biennial
Arts Center of the Capital Region
Screenprints, also referred to as serigraphs or silk screen prints, are made using a process based on the stencil principle in which ink is forced through the exposed areas of the mesh screen. A separate screen is required for each color in the artist’s composition and the same piece of paper is printed with each screen in succession. The resultant image is simple, yet bold and often has a graphic quality. The 2016 Screenprint Biennial will be a two-month long event, from October to December 2016, encompassing multiple art exhibitions, a symposium, and talks by two nationally recognized artists (Josh Macphee and John Hitchcock). This project is the curatorial project of Nathan Meltz, printmaker and lecturer in the Art Department of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, NY. In January 2017 a version of the biennial exhibit will also travel to the Center for Contemporary Printmaking in Norwalk, CT where it will be exhibited through March, 2017.
Kala's Permanent Archive and Print Collection, 1974-present
Kala's Permanent Archive and Print Collection, 1974-present
Kala Art Institute
Since its founding in 1974, Kala Art Institute has provided opportunities and professional working facilities to artists in all forms of printmaking, photography, book arts, installation and digital media. Kala’s programs directly support professional artists working in and across printmaking and digital media, as they take artistic risks and experiment with new forms of printmaking and related media. Emerging and established artists use Kala’s facilities to develop and exhibit new and experimental, as well as fine traditional artwork. As such, it has served as a meeting ground where artists from the Bay Area and from around the globe work together and exchange ideas. The Institute’s archive and print collection consists of 2500+ prints by local, national, and international artists and serves as an important historical record of its 42 years of serving artists who create prints. Making the collection public and accessible serves Kala’s mission: to help artists sustain their creative work over time through its artist‐in‐residence and fellowship programs, and to engage the community through exhibitions, public programs and education.
Steamroller Printing 2017
Steamroller Printing 2017
The Lawrence Arts Center
Since its founding in 1975, the Lawrence Arts Center has been enriching the Lawrence community and the State of Kansas by providing access to contemporary exhibitions, performance, and visual and performing arts education programming. Founded as a public/private partnership between the City of Lawrence and local residents, the Arts Center’s institutional home—a 40,000 square foot center in downtown Lawrence—features three exhibition galleries, a 300-seat theater, two dance studios, two arts-based preschool classrooms, a black box theater, and seven visual arts studios. The Arts Center actively serves a diverse population consistent with area demographics. More than 30% of the district’s students qualify for the Federal Free and Reduced School Lunch program, and 25% of residents are 18 years of age or younger. The Arts Center gives financial aid to those who qualify under the federal criteria of poverty level, very low income, and low income. In 2014 and 2015, the Lawrence Arts Center offered the Steamroller Printing project as an eight-week class to students aged 14 and up. Under the guidance of the Arts Center’s print fellow, the students carved relief patterns into large MDF boards and the class culminated with a public street party, during which the City of Lawrence’s Public Works Department provided a steamroller and steamroller operator to help each student print their relief patterns onto paper and muslin. Last year the Lawrence Art Center was unable to offer the printmaking class because without underwriting or outside support, the class was too expensive to offer. With funding provided by the IFPDA Foundation, the Center will again be able to offer the course in 2017. The 2017 course will be taught by visiting artist Dennis McNett, who will lead students in the creation of largescale prints and provide an interactive, public demonstration of his technique for transferring these prints onto what he calls “happenings” --sculptural performance pieces that become the focus of public parties, parades, and festivals. By using fine prints as a focal point for public gatherings, and with the partnership of the city of Lawrence, this project brings together artists and non-artists alike to appreciate printmaking as a fine art that can also be a form of community.
The Elements of Etching: Process and Innovation in Late 19th-Century Paris
The Elements of Etching: Process and Innovation in Late 19th-Century Paris
RISD Museum
This grant supports the production of an online exhibition catalogue publication to accompany the upcoming exhibition “The Elements of Etching: Process and Innovation in Late 19th-Century Paris” to planned for July of 2017. This exhibition will reveal how the etching process fostered creativity and experimentation to an unprecedented degree in both subject matter and form among artists working in Paris in the late 1800s. Focusing on a concentration of activity over several decades, it includes well-known artists—such as Edgar Degas, Mary Cassatt, and Edouard Manet—as well as those lesser known today, including Ludovic-Napoléon Lepic and Albert Besnard. The exhibition draws from RISD’s centrality in the field of contemporary printmaking and from accomplished artists and master printers in its prestigious Printmaking Department. The publication will be the first to combine the specialized knowledge of art historians and the technical knowledge of printmakers to understand the ways that the independent and private production of etchings led this medium to become a locus for creativity and formal experimentation during this period in Paris. The catalogue will build upon recent work of other museums as part of the Online Scholarly Catalogue Initiative and feature an easy to navigate interface supporting research by scholars as well as a wider general audience. In this manner, it will increase scholarly knowledge of and engagement with 19th-century European etching based on new technical investigation and encourage collaboration between art historians and accomplished printmakers.
Classicisms
Classicisms
Smart Museum of Art at the University of Chicago
Scheduled for February 16 – June 11, 2017, this exhibition explores classicism’s enduring influence on visual art from antiquity through the 20th century, while examining its shifting aesthetic and sociocultural implications across multiple eras and contexts. Co-curated by Larry Norman, Chair and Professor in the department of Romance Languages and Literatures at the University of Chicago and Anne Leonard, Curator and Associate Director of Academic Initiatives at the Smart Museum, the exhibition will trace classicism’s changing usage and meanings from varying artistic, cultural, and ideological perspectives. It will bring together sculptures, paintings, prints, drawings, and photographs from the Smart’s holdings as well as from the Art Institute of Chicago, Cadbury Research Library at the University of Birmingham (United Kingdom), The Horvitz Collection (Boston), the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Museum of Modern Art (new York), the Newberry Library (Chicago), the University of Chicago Regenstein Library, and the Spurlock Museum of World Cultures (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign). One third of this cross-media exhibition will consist of prints spanning the late 16th through mid-20th centuries. The grant will support the scholars contributing original research, essays, and other texts for the exhibition catalogue. All of the participating scholars are engaging directly with original prints, deepening their understanding of the medium.
HANGA NOW: Contemporary Japanese Printmakers
HANGA NOW: Contemporary Japanese Printmakers
University of Saint Joseph Art Museum
This will be the first museum exhibition in the Northeast in more than thirty years to present a survey of the most important Japanese printmakers working today in all print media, from color woodblocks to etchings, mezzotints, lithographs and screen prints. Since the opening of a new arts building in 2001, several exhibitions organized by the Art Museum have been favorably reviewed in the New York Times, in which critic Benjamin Genocchio deemed the Museum “one of the liveliest campus museums in the state.” This exhibition is organized by Ann Sievers, the Art Museum’s Director/Curator, a specialist in Japanese prints. Featured artist Tamekane Yoshikatsu will offer printmaking demonstrations at nearby Smith College and the Loomis-Chaffe School. In addition, both the Greenwich Historical Society and the Bellarmine Museum at Fairfield University will mount collaborative programming on Japanese art.
Lasting Impressions: The Artists of Currier & Ives
Lasting Impressions: The Artists of Currier & Ives
Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library
Lasting Impressions is the first exhibition to investigate the role of two of the firm’s most prolific artists, Frances Bond Palmer and Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait. Drawing on new research, this exhibition locates Palmer and Tait’s prints among a very limited high-end collection of fine prints sold and advertised by Currier & Ives as fine arts. Through their association with printmaking and with this publisher of popular lithographs, Palmer and Tait expressed innovative visions of artistic creation in a world that witnessed the early stages of mass visual culture. This exhibition will provide a greater awareness of the roles of lithography and two under-studied artists in the development of nineteenth-century American fine arts. The exhibition will invite its visitors to experience and appreciate nineteenth-century art in print through the connoisseurship-oriented attitude that characterized many nineteenth-century viewers, adapted to our own era thanks to the use of contemporary technology and devices. Multimedia installations (an app created for the show) will engage and develop visitor awareness, available on iPads in the gallery and on the exhibition website. Other programs include lectures on hand coloring techniques, print collecting, and the role of prints in American art.