IFPDA - Artwork
Anger

Pieter Brueghel

Anger

1558

Engraving

227 x 299 mm

Stanza Del Borgo S.R.L.

Milan,

+39 02 659 8203

Price upon request

More Information

Engraving, by Pieter van der Heiden after Peter Bruegel.
New Hollstein, n. 21, Lebeer 18, Orenstein, 2001, only state.
Sheet 227 x 299 mm. 
Inscribed at lower left: .P. brueghel. Inuentor.; at lower center: PAME (monogram); IRA; at lower right: .H. Cock. excude. Cum gratia et privilegio .1558.; in lower margin: ORA TUMENT IRA, NIGRESCUNT SANGUINE VENAE.
(Anger makes the face  swell up, and  the veins grow black with blood.) / Gramscap doet den mont swillen/ en verbittert den moet /Sy beroert den gheest/ en maeckt swert den bloet. (Anger makes the mouth swell, and embitters the nerves; it  disturbs the spirit, and blackens the blood).
Engraved by Pieter van der Heyden after Peter Bruegel, edited by Hieronymus Cock.
From the series of Seven Deadly Sins, completed between 1556 and 1558. The preparatory drawing, in pen and brown ink, dated 1557, is preserved at the Gabinetto Disegni e Stampe degli Uffizi, Florence.
Fine harmonious impression of this rare engraving, printed with a great clarity and plate-tone, in the only state, according to Nadine Orenstein, in very good condition. The guidelines are visible, characteristic of the early impressions. 
In 1556 Bruegel started to work on his most elaborate achievement in the field of allegorical composition as subjects for prints after his design. 
The Series of Seven Deadly Sins is carried out in the style of Hieronymus Bosch and filled with fantastic figures in a landscapes.
The caption at the bottom of the engraving describes how the angry man  is prevented by the deadly sin of wrath to use Will and Reason, the only two sources of moral action. 'Wrath congests the face, poisons the soul, the spirit upsets and corrupts the blood'.
The series of Seven Deadly Sins was completed between 1556 and 1558.
Reference:
Nadine M. Orenstein, Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Drawings and Prints, New York-London, 2001, page 158, n. 54.