Philip Guston

Canadian , 1913 - 1980

Born in 1913, Philip Guston was a leading painter of the post-World War era. He is known for his Abstract Expressionist works that often convey frank, social commentary. Essentially, Guston was a self-taught artist studying, only briefly, at the Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles.

Guston painted murals for the Works Progress Administration project from 1932 to 1940. In 1947 he received a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Prix de Rome and an American Academy of Arts and Letters grant, which allowed him to study Renaissance painting in Europe. In 1950 Guston and Jackson Pollack founded the New York School of Abstract Expressionism. In 1959 Guston’s work was shown at the Bienal de Sao Paulo and in 1960 at the Venice Biennale.

In 1977 Guston made a serigraph (the only one he ever made) for “Inscapes: Words and Images”, a city-wide festival held in Washington D.C. to celebrate the collaboration of poetry and the visual arts. The print was one of the first pieces in Guston’s now-famous Neo- Expressionist series.
Artworks
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Elements

1980

Mary Ryan Gallery, Inc.

Price upon request

Studio Corner

1980

Mary Ryan Gallery, Inc.

Price upon request

Gulf

1983

Krakow Witkin Gallery

$12,000 - $35,000

Elements

1980

Susan Sheehan Gallery

$5,500 - $12,000

East Side

1980

Susan Sheehan Gallery

Price upon request

Room

1980

Susan Sheehan Gallery

$12,000 - $35,000

Summer

1980

Susan Sheehan Gallery

$5,500 - $12,000