Hiroshi Yoshida

Japanese , 1876 - 1950

Born in 1876, Hiroshi Yoshida is considered one of the leading figures of the renewal of Japanese printmaking after the cessation of the Meiji period in 1912. Yoshida’s artistic talent was discovered early and he entered a private art school in Tokyo at the age of 18. He began as a painter and was awarded many art exhibition prizes. Around 1920, he began creating woodblock prints, and soon after, he met Watanabe Shozaburo, publisher and owner of the Watanabe print store in Tokyo. In 1923, all of Yoshida’s wood blocks and over a hundred of his prints were lost when an earthquake destroyed Watanabe’s store.

In 1925, following a visit to the United States, Yoshida began employing his own artisan carvers and printers. An avid traveler, Yoshida visited the United States, China, Korea, Europe, Africa, India and different regions of Japan. His love for traveling and the mountains are reflected in his prints, which depict landscape scenes and subjects from Japan and the European Alps. In his later years, Yoshida planned a series of prints titled, “One Hundred Views of the World”, but he died before the project was started.

Throughout his career, Yoshida created 259 woodblocks, seven published by Watanabe and the rest by Yoshida himself. He had two sons, Toshi Yoshida and Hodaka Yoshida, who also became great artists.
Artworks
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Numazaki Pasture

ca. 1928

Scholten Japanese Art

$12,000 - $35,000

New York (Nyu yoruku)

1928

Scholten Japanese Art

$5,500 - $12,000

Sailing Boats Night

1926

Verne Collection, Inc.

Price upon request

Sailing Boats Morning

1926

Verne Collection, Inc.

Price upon request

Umagaeshi (The Horse Turnback at Umagaeshi)

1928

Thomas French Fine Art

Price upon request

El Capitan, from the American Series

1925

The Art of Japan

Price upon request

Evening After Rain.

1926

Allinson Gallery, Inc.

$2,200 - $5,500